Adoption of agro-tech in India


 21 Aug 2019  |    06:57 PM  |    K Ujjwala


Adoption of agro-tech in India

Adoption of agro-tech in India

Agriculture has always played a very important and strategic role in the development of a country and also has a major contribution to the economic sectors. Hence, boosting agricultural productivity has always been the main focus of the government, especially in developing nations like India. One step that the government has been focusing on is the adoption of agrotechnology. Agrotechnology refers to methodology or machinery used in agriculture for efficient production. This has a potential to deepen the market share of agricultural output. This will also result in the boost or increase of competition in the market which lowers the processing and marketing costs, which further results  in real food prices. But there is always a question - is India slow to this method of adoption and is India utilizing all the methods and techniques possible under this? One scenario that can be given to understand this question is - the Punjab farmers. These farmers grow develop and grow varieties of crops such as wheat HD 3086, and the same farmers are still using the old methods. There is also the issue of slow adoption and also not all available method being used, this is mainly because of the poor communication of sciences to farmers. In a country where the literacy rate of men (25%) and women(44%) in rural areas is more than average which also includes people who can't read in their native languages, how can we communicate science to them is the major hurdle. There is also an ongoing case study that talks about this issue - SHC scheme or the Soil Health Card scheme. One tool that has high potential to promote agro-tech on India is through subsidies. Every agriculture related thing, from quality of seeds to new machines are backed up by subsidies. Of these government favoured policies, subsidies are designed and promoted well, there can be accelerations in technology adoption and incentivisation for new innovations. These all can be done by a small group of policy makers or techno-crats instead of aiming for a huge and quick change in a short period of time, which can give us the results of the "Great leap forward" in China.